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Mar312011

Schloss Dawson Zwei Hundchen Zweimaschverfahren Dunkel-Kellerbier

The name has to be that long so you have time to do a double decoction mash while you say it. A Munich-style dark lager, as brewed in Episode 34.

10.5 gallons, all-grain
Target OG: 1.056

Grist:

  • 16.5 lbs Munich Malt
  • 0.75 lbs Weyermann CaraFoam
  • 0.75 lbs Melanoidin malt
  • 0.5 lbs Weyermann CaraAroma
  • 0.25 lbs Weyermann CaraFa III Spezial

Mash:

There are many ways to de-integument a feline; here's what I did in the episode:

  • Dough in at 95 F, direct heat MLT to raise temp to the ...
    • Protein rest - 122 F
  • Decoction 1 - pull 19 L thick mash, heat w/ rest at 158 F, boil & return to MLT
    • Sacch' rest 1 - 148 F
  • Decoction 2 - pull 9 L thick mash, boil & return to MLT
    • Sacch' rest 2 - 158 F
  • Mash out - pull ~4 gal thin mash, boil & return to MLT

Boil:

  • 2 oz German Tradition (pellet) @ FWH

Fermentation:

  • WLP833 German Bock lager, big starter
  • 10 days @ 55 F, then
    • A - racked to carboy, lager ~ 6 wks
    • B - racked to keg, store cool ~ 10 days, then tap
  • A will get the more conventional treatment - proper lager period, full dose of CO2
  • B will be the Kellerbier - served young, hazy, and at low vol. of CO2; you can read more about how I do that here

 

5 gallon extract version?

Sure: Substitute 6.3 lbs Northern Brewer Munich malt syrup plus 1 lb Amber DME for the Munich malt in the grist; use half the quantity of the remaining grains (cause the recipe is for 10 gallons) and steep them as normal. Use 1.5 oz Tradition pellets at 60" for a partial-volume boil.

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Reader Comments (18)

That´s real brewing!

April 8, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterReinhard

Dawson,
I may have missed it in the episode, I have a newborn and have tried to watch it twice, but you know how that can be.......I was wondering what the durations of the individual steps were. Also, is munich malt unmodified hence requiring the decoction or were we decocting only for flavor profile? Thanks Lyman

April 16, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterDeLiguori

Great episode fellas!

April 16, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterStu

Yes, hooray for brewporn. Make more episodes like this one.

April 17, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterMichael

@DeLiguori - The duration of each mash step lasts as long as that particular decoction takes (the main mash sits at temperature x while the decoction heats and boils). Munich malt isn't undermodified (by definition anyway) - I was using Global Malz Munich 20, which is a nice, modern malt that can (in my experience) be happily infusion mashed. Technically we were decoction mashing for the hell of it, but flavor and tradition are right in there too. Cheers! And congrats on the new addition!

April 24, 2011 | Registered CommenterDawson

What is the size of your brew pots? I do extract brews right now and I am saving for some all grain equipment, and new brew pot. I want to buy sizes that I can use for anything? What do you recommend?

June 6, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterAnthmonkey

@Anthmonkey - I have a 15 gal boiler and a 10 gal MLT and HLT, but unless you want to go to 10 gallon batches right away that's more capacity than you'd need. I'd start with one good 10 gallon brew pot with a ball valve, and a cooler or two - that's my $0.02.

June 6, 2011 | Registered CommenterDawson

Dawson,

I saw this episode last week and I hope you see my comment (I know I'm late). I was wondering if you pitched the yeast at a "warm" temperature and brought it down into the lager fermenting temperatures (50-55) or if you "cold" pitched directly in the 50'.

Thank you.

August 2, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterRoberto

I am new to AG brewing. I have a question about bottling the lager after the 6 weeks(version <A> above under fermentation). To get proper carbonation in the bottles, do you need to add a priming sugar after the 6 week long secondary fermentation? Can you rack to bottles after primary fermentation? If so, do you still need to add a priming sugar?

Thanks

August 5, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterJim

@ Jim - Lightning round!

To get proper carbonation in the bottles, do you need to add a priming sugar after the 6 week long secondary fermentation?
Short answer is yes.

Slightly longer answer is depending on the temp of the beer during the lager phase and how much further CO2 developed and was absorbed by the liquid during secondary, your lager may require a lower rate of priming sugar than an ale, which being conditioned at a warmer temp wouldn't have absorbed as much/any gas. Also depends on desired vol. of CO2 in the bottles ... a priming/carbonation calculator like the one in Beersmith or iBrewmaster is immensely helpful for getting it fine-tuned.

Can you rack to bottles after primary fermentation?
Yes. Although this isn't a very common practice for bottled lager, I have had bottle-conditioned kellerbiers. At this point the beer will still have some fermentation character, so that may be a good or bad thing depending on what you want in the finished product and on the yeast you're using - see the link under Fermentation for batch B.

If so, do you still need to add a priming sugar?
Yes, with the same caveats for temp/dissolved CO2 as above and the additional caveat of "I strongly advise waiting until terminal gravity is reached before bottling." A little extra refermentation in a keg is not a dealbreaker, but not necessarily cool in a tightly-sealed glass container.

August 5, 2011 | Registered CommenterDawson

Dawson,

When you make a yeast starter for a lager, do you cool the starter wort to 55 degrees before adding the yeast?

August 6, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterJoe

@Joe - no sir. One can do that, and I have in the past, but I have taken to fermenting all starters at room temp - since one main goal of a starter is cell growth and not flavor. I've recommended it before & elsewhere, but "Yeast" by White & Zainasheff is worth the read: http://www.northernbrewer.com/brewing/brewing-books/brewing-books/brewing-how-to-books/yeast-the-practical-guide-to-beer-fermentation.html

August 6, 2011 | Registered CommenterDawson

dawson- im brewing an altbier this coming monday using a decoction method similar to the one you so elegantly illustrated. i use a converted cooler turned mash tun, so in order to achieve multiple temperature rests i have to incorporate hot water additions. (im referring to the acid rest and protein rest) what was your beginning pound per quart grist ratio? is a more dilluted initial grist ideal for a decoction mash? also, im going to do an open primary fermentation with this altbier. do you think that WLP029 German Ale/Kolsch yeast would lend itself well to such an undertaking? im hoping to strike a balance between the insane maltiness gained from the decoction, the insane hoppiness from dry hopping with whole leaf Hallertau, and hopefully a fruity/estery character from open fermentation. i realize that this was a couple of episodes ago, but any insight would be greatly appreciated. if i don't hear from you before brew day, ill have to let you know how it turns out

October 5, 2011 | Unregistered Commenterbigjohn

bigjohn - Lightning round part 2!

(im referring to the acid rest and protein rest)
Not sure of your altbier's grain bill, but unless there's a bunch of pils malt in it, you might consider saving some time by not bothering with an acid rest since the phytase that acidifies the mash is denatured by kilning temps for darker base grains like Munich malt ... just throwing that out there. (you could instead use a small % of Weyermann acidulated malt and accomplish a "malt-based" pH adjustment without adding salts/acid solutions)

what was your beginning pound per quart grist ratio?
I usually do 1.5 - 2 qt per lb. That's just me, but I believe it's fairly standard.

is a more dilluted initial grist ideal for a decoction mash?
Yeah, it's good for the mechanics of decoction because it allows for sufficient liquid to remain in the MLT while the decoction is pulled - once you dough in, the malt enzymes that you need to accomplish conversion are in solution, so that's why you want to keep most of the thin mash out of the decoction boiler until mashout.

im going to do an open primary fermentation with this altbier. do you think that WLP029 German Ale/Kolsch yeast would lend itself well to such an undertaking?
I think so, probably. I've used WLP029 a bunch but always in a closed fermentation. Please let us know how it turns out!

October 6, 2011 | Registered CommenterDawson

Brewed this recipe about two months ago (using only a single decoction) - fantastic beer! Chocolate, light roast, creamy, touch of hops - great recipe.

December 29, 2011 | Unregistered CommenterBob

Hi, great recipe. What was your hop schedue?

Johhnyaze

May 5, 2012 | Unregistered CommenterJohhnyglaze

@Johnnyglaze - it's listed there, under "Boil" ... 2 oz Tradition pellets at FWH.

May 7, 2012 | Registered CommenterDawson

I'm a year late in responding, but the alt turned out really really smooth. The open fermentation was skipped because I chickened out, but the decoction mash helped make it really malty and smooth, and dry hopping with whole leaf hallertau made for a very pleasant aftertaste. I'm going to brew another German lager this Friday and perform another decoction mash, (which is what led me back to this page) but I'm not sure what it should be
classified as. It's a 5 gallon batch with 4lbs pilsner malt, 4lbs
Munich malt, and 2 lbs Vienna malt. WL833 yeast and a single hop addition - 1 oz tradition at 60 mins

October 2, 2012 | Unregistered CommenterBigjohn

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